Latest Entries

Coolest snowman in town

submitted by Gozo College Middle School : Maia Camilleri  for 11-14
campaign: Litter Less Campaign Entry
dissemination(s): school magazine,website,school media,other,EkoSkola Noticeboard, EkoSkola blog
filed under Photos Reporting photo

In December 2017 the Villa Rundle Gardens in Victoria were transformed into a winter wonderland to create a Christmas spirit. This was done with the help of the residents of Santa Marta Day centre and Dar Padova, the primary schools in Gozo and the Ministry for Gozo. Most of the decorations were created using recycled materials such as this happy snowman which was made out of used tyres.

Read More

A Littered Picnic

submitted by Zejtun St Thomas More Secondary School : Yasmin Borg, Anis Riahi, Selma Zinou  for 11-14
campaign: YRE Entry
dissemination(s): school magazine,website,other,School monitor in the reception area
filed under Photos Reporting photo

Enjoying a picnic in a public park and yet surrounded by litter. Is it so difficult to enjoy a picnic in the open air? Dumping litter onto the ground not only is an eyesore but also threatens wildlife. Littering also contributes to water pollution and costs the country money. Litter can also block drain pipes leading to more flooding. Furthermore, litter is also unhygienic and can lead to illness. The presence of litter indicates lack of respect for the other people living in the community. Why should we pay taxes to employ workers to clean our litter when we can all do our mite to deposit our litter in provided bins or take it home with us? Does it have to cost us so much effort and money to keep our country clean?

Read More

The Transformation of Virtual Water to Compost

submitted by Zejtun St Thomas More Secondary School : Krista Gatt, Marija Camilleri  for 11-14
campaign: Litter Less Campaign Entry
dissemination(s): other, School monitor in the reception area, school magazine, website
filed under Articles

A vermi compost bin was set up using shredded newspapers, soil and organic waste. The organic waste was obtained from the remains of fruit and vegetables and instead of being placed in a normal bin, they are placed in a compost bin. Earthworms were placed within the compost bin. It is these earthworms which feed on the organic waste and are converted into other substances which increase the soil fertility.

Read More

Treasures of the Sea or Destroyers of the Sea?

submitted by Zejtun St Thomas More Secondary School : Krista Gatt  for 11-14
campaign: YRE Entry
dissemination(s): school magazine,website,other,School monitor in the reception area
filed under Photos Reporting photo

As time goes by, harbours require maintenance. One such activity involves the dredging of the seabed (the removal of unwanted sediment). Unfortunately, a large percentage of the seabed present within commercial harbours ends up accumulating various items. Most of these include material derived from the loading and unloading of cargo such as steel, rubber pipes and lost cargo. Tyres, which are usually used as fenders, also from time to time end up on the seabed. Sadly, not only visible materials are dredged. The upper layer of the seabed is also contaminated with toxic substances from paint, oil and other chemicals. The attached photo shows materials mentioned above, which were dredged from the Grand Harbour of Valletta in October 2017. In this particular operation, the total amount of steel collected reached 1.8 tons!

Read More

One man’s waste… another man’s treasure

submitted by St. Thomas More Secondary School Zejtun : Marija Camilleri  for 11-14
campaign: YRE Entry
dissemination(s): other, School monitor in the reception area, school magazine, website
filed under Photos Reporting photo
awarded: 1st place Litter less Campaign

Modern societies have adopted a throw-away culture. In Europe, in 2015, each person has generated an average of 477kg of municipal waste. In Malta alone, each person generates more than 600kg of waste yearly. Environmental awareness has helped for disposing of our waste wisely by reusing and recycling paper, metal, plastic and glass. However, we are still wasting resources as we are throwing away organic matter generated in our households through food scraps, vegetable waste, tea bags, dead leaves and twigs. Nature shows us clearly that one man’s waste can be another’s treasure. Instead of filling our landfills with organic waste, we can give nature the opportunity to do its job and break it down into compost. Compost can then be used to enrich soil with the nutrients it needs.

Read More