Latest Entries

Rubbish on cliffs

submitted by St. Margaret College Boys Secondary Verdala : Thomas Grimant  for 15-18
dissemination(s): newspaper
filed under Photos

On one of my Sunday afternoon walks reaching Fort Delimara in Marsaxlokk, I saw lots of rubbish and waste at the end of Delimara point. Rubbish, consisting mostly of household waste is strewn over the cliff face of one of the most beautiful points of our Maltese islands creating a potentially toxic problem. By heavy wind and rain contaminants could leak into the nearby sea harming our local ecosystems. Few people realize that cliff or coastal waste could end up falling into the sea and that some contaminated waste could find its way into our marine environment. Pollutants like heavy metals, pesticides and other chemicals could make their way into the marine food chain and perhaps end up being consumed by people. On contacting the local council I was told that withstanding their regular clean ups people keep on throwing rubbish so I recommended more law enforcement safeguarding Delimara point.



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My Story (A Bath)

submitted by Giovanni Curmi Naxxar Higher Secondary School : Mariel Bartolo  for 15-18
dissemination(s): newspaper, radio, school magazine, school media
filed under Photos

I used to live in a high rise block of apartments, where many families lived on top of each other, and side by side each other. I could hear their talks, laughs, cries and expressions. I could smell all the emissions from the large amounts of cars that used to drive past my residence. I could see the smog, on most of the mornings. I could feel the soap that used to run down my drains, smell the cigarettes that my owners smoked, hear all the noises all day long. All of a sudden I found myself in this bliss . . . . . where I can hear silence . . . . I can hear the birds, the wind, the crawls of living things! I can breathe fresh air but I cannot understand why the green grass, the living things around me keep looking so sadly at me!



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It’s all about PLASTIC junk!

submitted by Private candidate : Joslyn Falzon  for 15-18
dissemination(s): newspaper, website
filed under Photos

As one generation ago, the culture of disposable goods was much more on a smaller scale, than nowadays. This photo was taken in an abundant house in Zabbar. Glass bottles, re-usable containers and other recyclable packaging materials could be easily recycled. While plastics can indeed be recycled, they degrade in quality through the recycling process, until eventually plastics can’t be recycled and have to be taken to landfills. Unfortunately times changed, and major businesses found it more cost-effective to use plastic. If everyone in the world simply make a few changes in the way they consume plastic items, the problem would at least be limited and, with changed attitudes, those in power could slowly mend the damage that’s been done. I really hope that in the near future, things will get better and there will be more individual awareness.



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Poor creature

submitted by St Thomas More GSS Santa Lucia : El Kayati Fatima, Farrugia Antonella, Saliba Nicole  for 15-18
dissemination(s): EkoSkola Notice board, FB teachers' group, other, school monitors
filed under Photos

Sometimes the use of pesticides kills insects it is intended to, and others that prey on them. Without these insects the eco system will be in trouble, which will result in damage to our life. Pollution is also dangerous to various creatures because it will effect their life. This insect died because it got trapped in a plastic bag. We need to keep our nature clean from pollution so as to avoid unnecessary deaths.



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Cigarettes a Major Cause of Litter

submitted by Private candidate : Joslyn Falzon  for 15-18
dissemination(s): newspaper, website
filed under Photos

Cigarette butts, snack wrappers, take-out food and beverage containers are the most commonly littered items. Cigarettes are one of the most insidious forms of litter all over the world that may be small, but they aren’t harmless. The fiberglass in the filters contains toxic chemicals that end up in storm drains, which eventually lead to our waterways. The second most littered item is fast food wrappers, followed by beer and soda cans. Next time you’re tempted to flick that cigarette butt out the car window or toss your food wrapper on the ground, just think about how long that junk will stick around. Paper, which is completely recyclable, takes six months to decompose. Plastic bottles, which are also recyclable, take five to ten years. Plastic shopping bags: ten to thirty years. Be aware before committing a simply action, because it can cause more harm than benefits.



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