Latest Entries

The ghost towns of Malta

submitted by St. Clare's College Girls' Secondary Pembroke : Janice Bugeja, Mariah Attard  for 11-14
dissemination(s): school magazine, website
filed under Photos

Anyone driving along Xemxija Bay can admire views of the beautiful Mediterranean Sea . Decades ago the road along the bay was lined with beautiful two storey sea side residences. Nowadays high rise buildings consisting of numerous apartments have sprouted, towering imposingly over the bay. Old properties have become vacant and many are in a dilapidated state. The national consensus, 2011, shows that there are around 70 000 vacant properties in Malta. It has been said that this is equivalent to 9 ghost towns. Some of these properties can be made habitable with some investment. Why do we keep constructing new buildings which claim more land? This issue needs to be tackled and people should be encouraged to rehabilitate old properties rather than build new ones.



Read More

Standing in the hall of fame?

submitted by St. Clare's College Girls' Secondary Pembroke : Alexia Formosa  for 11-14
dissemination(s): school magazine, website
filed under Photos

The Australia Hall in Pembroke, built for the benefit of wounded soldiers in the First World War served as a recreation centre in its glory days. Drama, bingo and stage productions were held in this hall which could accommodate some 2000 men. Today, almost one hundred years since its completion, this historic hall lies in a piteous state where the only culture being promoted is that of the occult. This derelict building is strewn with litter and bulky refuse which besides being an eyesore can be dangerous for youngsters who decide to explore the place. Legal action was taken some years ago by Lands department to recover the building but as yet no significant results have been achieved. How many more years must elapse before serious action is taken? Pembroke would benefit from having a restored town hall. Let’s hope it will not be too late!



Read More

Waste Collection or the lack of it!

submitted by Mosta Boys Secondary School : Justin Clive Bugeja  for 11-14
dissemination(s): school magazine, school media, website
filed under Photos

Waste collection is part of the process of waste management. It is the transfer of solid waste from the point of use and disposal to the point of treatment or landfill. Waste collection also includes the curbside collection of recyclable materials that technically are not waste, as part of a municipal landfill Diversion program. Waste Collection considerations include type and size of bins, their positioning, and how often bins are to be serviced. Overfilled bins result in rubbish falling out while being tipped. Hazardous rubbish like empty petrol cans can cause fires igniting other trash when the truck compactor is operating. Bins may be stored in secure areas to avoid having non-paying parties placing rubbish in the bin. Truck drivers are now being trained in identifying and managing power-line hazards. Front lift garbage truck lift hooks may pull down power lines if left upright at the top of the trunk



Read More

Il-kelb qed jagħmel il-ħmieġ u sidu mhux qed jiġbru…

submitted by Mosta Boys Secondary School : Nathaniel Camilleri  for 11-14
dissemination(s): school magazine, school media, website
filed under Photos

Kemm hu sabih li wieħed ikollu kelb bħala pett tiegħu. Hu annimal li jifraħ ħafna meta jara lil sidu. Dan jagħmlu dejjem, anke jekk sidu jittrattah ħażin. Mhux ta’ b’xejn jissejjaħ l-ikbar ħabib tal-bniedem. Imma li jkollok kelb għandha responsabilta ukoll. Waqt xi mixja il-kelb ġeneralment iħammeġ xi ftit għax jipporga. Jekk dan il-ħmieġ ma jibdiex jinġabar jibda jakkumula, u jkun hawn il-konsegwenzi tiegħu. Mhix xi ħaġa sabiħa li tkun miexi u tara ħafna rqajja ta’ ħmieġ, triq toqgħod b’seba’ għajnejn fejn tmidd saqajk. Konsegwenzi oħra hemm ir-riħa tintenn u d-dubbien. Huwa mportanti li meta wieħed joħroġ il-kelb u dan iħammeġ, għandu jinġabar mill-ewwel f’xi borża li wieħed jista’ faċilment iġorr miegħu u din tintrema f’reċipjenti apposta. Biex jenforzaw li wieħed jiġbor dan il-ħmieġ, jekk xi ħadd jinqabad iħammeġ jeħel multa. Mela kun responsabli, ġorr borża miegħek u jekk il-kelb iħammeġ iġborr warajh biex inżommu Malta nadifa.



Read More

Jellyfish invasion – Where are the turtles now?

submitted by The Archbishop's Seminary : Benjamin Dalli  for 11-14
dissemination(s): newspaper, school magazine, website
filed under Photos

The “jellyfish problem” in Malta persists year after year, thus becoming a major concern of tourists and locals alike, therefore coming to one question: Where are the turtles now?  Ironically, turtles are becoming endangered due to waste left by the same people who complain about the increasing amount of jellyfish.  A turtle’s diet consists of many small sea creatures such as jellyfish.  This is a threat to marine creatures as these plastic bits are mistaken for jellyfish and swallowed.  Apart from this, the turtle’s habitat is secluded beaches, and the overexpoitation of sandy beaches is furthermore eliminating turtles.  Fishing is a traditional trade in the Maltese Islands and fishermen, together with their catch, have incidentally captured turtles.  After being injured by bycatch, they are then released, without any medical attention.  Hotels and restaurants sometimes dump untreated chemicals into the sea, jeopardising marine life.  Turtles are consequently protected to avoid extinction.



Read More