Latest Entries

Wind Energy

submitted by The Archbishop's Seminary : Irvine Sultana  for 11-14
dissemination(s): newspaper, school magazine, school media, website
filed under Photos

The Xarolla Windmill has been recently restored. Locals are very proud of this architectural testimonial which showcases a small yet important part of the life of our hard working ancestors. Our small island is decorated with such beauty and our people and local councils are working to keep it well. In this world, bigger countries have less historical features than we do so decreasing vandalism will enable more citizens to enjoyed such architectural gems. The windmill is a perfect of example which utilizes a natural renewable resource to work – wind. Wind energy used to make the palettes turn and these in turn rotated a simple gear wheel within the windmill itself. This was connected to circular plates between which wheat could be placed and then ground to produce flour and semolina. It is a sustainable practice which does not impinge on the already threatened energy industry.



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We never know the worth of water till the well runs dry

submitted by The Archbishop's Seminary : Nick Mifsud  for 11-14
dissemination(s): newspaper, school magazine, school media, website
filed under Photos

Water is indeed a precious resource locally. Since most of the rain usually falls between October and March, its scarcity during the summer months creates a huge quandary for local farmers. The picture was taken after an abrupt storm but it can be easily noticed that the water run-off is huge. Unfortunately a large amount of run off rain water ends being lost since it finds its way back to the sea. It would be great if more reservoirs could be built, maybe under new apartment blocks in order to make better use of this resource. This the way forward for sustainability.



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Adaptation at its best

submitted by The Archbishop' s Seminary : Christian Falzon, Julian Seguna, Keith Borg, Kyle Farrugia, Malcolm Agius  for 11-14
dissemination(s): newspaper, school magazine, website
filed under Photos

The chameleon – Chamaleo chameleon, is an introduced reptile, in the sense that this specie was not originally found here. It has however adapted greatly to the local habitats. The typical habitats in which it lives are usually maquis, steppes and garigue. Known also as a Mediterranean species, it can also be found in specific areas in the South of Europe and also in Northern Africa. This type of species is different from other chameleons found around the world because it has an upward crest on the back part of its head. Although chameleons are famously known for the way they change their colour to camouflage themselves, in reality the colour changes because of varying body temperature. Chameleons eat insects such as mosquitoes and flies so they are very beneficial. To eat, they shoot out their sticky tongue further than the length of their head and body combined!



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Recycling Citrus

submitted by St Edward's College : Mattia Agius Muscat  for 11-14
dissemination(s): newspaper, school magazine, school media, website
filed under Video Clips

An interview with a local agricultural worker, who explains to us how easy it is to recycle even bio-degradable products in nature. Citrus peels are very common in our kitchen and provide our soil with very rich nutrients. Young Reporter for the Environment from Malta investigates the properties of citrus peel as ideal compost material.

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The Environment Surrounding Us …

submitted by St.Joseph Mater Boni Consilii Paola : Mariah Schembri, Nicole Camilleri  for 11-14
dissemination(s): school media, website
filed under Video Clips

My friend and I went to the countryside and took many photos of rubbish which people threw; we were impressed with all that litter we saw. We wish that we clean the countryside but there is so much litter and people are always dumping more. We hope that people seeing this video reflect upon these photos and see how we are ruining The Environment Surrounding Us … we should encourage more people to take care of our planet, after all this is OUR World, OUR Environment!

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