Latest Entries

A breathtaking view

submitted by The Archbishop's Seminary : Nico Aquilina  for 11-14
dissemination(s): school media
filed under Photos

Siġġiewi (or Città Ferdinand) is a village in the southwestern part of Malta. It is situated on a plateau, a few kilometres away from Mdina, the ancient capital city of Malta, and 10 kilometres away from Valletta, the contemporary capital. Many people in this quaint village used to work as farmers and in fact some of the rural aspects prevail. Indeed this photo is taken from a field and shows a breathtaking view that surrounds Siggiewi. The maquis area shows pristine natural surroundings which are an asset for tourism. Tourism in Malta is important and many tourists who come to Malta come to Siggiewi to see the magnificent natural environment and its overwhelming beauty.



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Imgiebah

submitted by The Archbishop's Seminary : Laurent Grech  for 11-14
dissemination(s): school media
filed under Photos

Imgiebah valley which lies at Selmun,has unique quaint features such as its U-shaped valley, the beach,the uplands and lowlands.It is one of the largest Natura 2000 sites.Blue clay hill slopes have been skillfully turned into terraced fields to make cultivate the preciously fertile soil. It hosts one of the only four Sclerophyll forest remnants in the Maltese islands, consisting of Holm Oak and Pine, rich in leaf litter and in forest undergrowth. Maquis areas dominated by Olive tree, Carob and Lentisk can be seen on the right-hand side. Opposite, stretches of rocky karstic ground with scattered pockets of soil trapped in the eroded limestone characterized the garrigue series,harbouring spiny and aromatic shrubs. Creating awareness about our natural surroundings would be the first step to increase sustainability efforts! Every one of us can give a hand to protect and conserve the environment. Let us really make a difference!



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Wells

submitted by The Archbishop's Seminary : Stefan Portelli  for 11-14
dissemination(s): school media
filed under Photos

In this picture there is a well in a Maltese home. Wells are becoming rare features in Maltese homes not only because people are living in smaller houses but also because wells are seen as added expense. Nearly 16% of the Maltese run-off water is wasted and the decrease in the number of wells in Malta is one of the main reasons why this water is being wasted. Maybe Local councils could help by creating various initiatives to have wells in houses to reduce the amount of run-off water that is being wasted. It is interesting to note that when Valetta was being built, the Knights of the Order of St. John, made the provision of wells compulsory for every house that was going to be constructed. It is high time that such regulations would be laid down and enforced once again!



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Fort Manoel

submitted by The Archbishop's Seminary : Fabrizio Zammit  for 11-14
dissemination(s): school media
filed under Photos

This breathtaking view is a part of the Maltese Archipelago. It is taken from the Sliema seafront. The magnificent Fort shown, has just been restored. You could also see the difference between the abandoned houses at the bottom of the photo and Fort Manoel. The purpose of the Fort was to protect the natural Marsamxett harbour. At the lower part of the island there was once a hospital for people who were infected with a disease known as the plague. The Hospital was called Lazaretto hospital. This picture clearly shows how the Knights made good use of the promontories available without creating uneccesary eyesores! Fort Manoel in fact blends in easily with the natural surroundings. We should make use of such good practices in all construction projects!



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Nature’s Three elements

submitted by The Archbishop's Seminary : Gilmor Formosa  for 11-14
dissemination(s): school media
filed under Photos

Siggiewi also known as Città Ferdinand is one of the most beautiful places in Malta. Siggiewi can be a suitable place for a person who loves the peacefulness and tranquillity that only nature can provide. This photo was taken from a high place in the south-east of Siggiewi. I named it the three elements of nature because it shows the three elements which are water, earth and the wind. In summer the water that you can see in the picture evaporates and in winter it will be filled with rain water providings clean sources of fresh water. The picture also indicates the farmers' good use of arable land – creating numerous terraced fields on the otherwise unusable slopes!



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