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Do green cars have a future in Malta?

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This article is related to 'green cars' in Malta. What is the future of these cars? What is the availability in Malta? You can find a reserach study to show more practical results about green cars available in Malta.

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Will our seas become a fetid rubbish dump?

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A calm walk by the sea… a breeze gently sweeping across the beaches and cliffs as the fresh sea air puts one at peace. The rotten stench of garbage, however, quickly reels one back to reality. Rubbish can clearly be seen around the coast of Malta, most particularly near those beaches which garner the most public attention. After a day of crowded tourists and locals, the beach is deserted, but plastic bags, bottles, cans and cigarette butts remain. The refuse teams ensure that the beach is relatively clean by the morning rush of people, but it is the mentality of the people that needs to change. Part of the inborn Maltese mentality, it seems, ensures that everywhere they go, some sort of refuse is left behind. The sea is a delicately balanced ecosystem, and trash poisons the water and has the potential to kill marine creatures as well as their predators. If we do not change, we will be surrounded by a murky swamp which harbours no life.



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Sailing in Malta – open seas, fair weather – what’s to grumble?

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This being Malta, and Malta being in the middle of one of the hottest seas in the world, fair weather and strong winds are a constant factor throughout the year. Our culture has revolved around the sea since our very origin, and events like the Middle Sea Race help the Maltese reconnect to their roots, even if not taking part directly, fostering a sense of awareness of the condition of the sea. Events such as these should be encouraged, for besides being a tourist attraction, they also endow upon the people who participate in them a sense of discipline, professionalism and, above all, respect for the abilities of different countries, as well as encouraging a love for the sea and responsibility as to the state it is in, for it reminds us all that the sea is integral to our lives, and that it needs to be protected.



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The wind of change makes our windmills move… yet is this change for better or for worse?

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The traditional windmill, once a common sight in Maltese fields, has all but disappeared from our nation’s agricultural inventory. Only a few remain to serenade our fields, replaced by electric pumps, fuelled by the hideously disruptive wires pictured. Their quiet grace seems to have blown out as the modernisation of the agricultural industry regards them as relics of the past. Apart from the pictured metal windmills introduced in the 1930s, there are also a few remaining stone windmills from the Knights’ period. Less than a dozen of these stone structures retain their sails, and most of them are degrading at an alarming rate. These windmills would have been used to crush grain, a practice which is now fully mechanized, with their structures either abandoned or used for various other purposes. To see the Maltese windmills vanish from our countryside would be a tragedy of the highest degree.



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Our heritage… monument to the past or stagnating relic?

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Fort St. Angelo. The site has been host to a military site of some sort of another since Arab times (9th century AD), the current structure dating back to the rule of the Knights of St. John (16th century AD). It has survived the Ottoman Empire and two world wars, but it seems as though it won’t survive the neglect that has befallen it. September 2009 saw the site’s closure due to cracks in its structure which were deemed hazardous to the public. Restoration efforts are still underway, and the site remains closed to the public. This is not the only archaeological site in the Maltese Islands which is falling apart before our eyes. Fort St. Elmo made it onto the list of the world’s 100 most endangered sites in 2008, and it seems that restoration efforts are too little, too late. Will all of our architectural heritage be lost to vandalism, neglect and indifference?



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