Latest Entries

Jellyfish invasion – Where are the turtles now?

submitted by The Archbishop's Seminary : Benjamin Dalli  for 11-14
dissemination(s): newspaper, school magazine, website
filed under Photos

The “jellyfish problem” in Malta persists year after year, thus becoming a major concern of tourists and locals alike, therefore coming to one question: Where are the turtles now?  Ironically, turtles are becoming endangered due to waste left by the same people who complain about the increasing amount of jellyfish.  A turtle’s diet consists of many small sea creatures such as jellyfish.  This is a threat to marine creatures as these plastic bits are mistaken for jellyfish and swallowed.  Apart from this, the turtle’s habitat is secluded beaches, and the overexpoitation of sandy beaches is furthermore eliminating turtles.  Fishing is a traditional trade in the Maltese Islands and fishermen, together with their catch, have incidentally captured turtles.  After being injured by bycatch, they are then released, without any medical attention.  Hotels and restaurants sometimes dump untreated chemicals into the sea, jeopardising marine life.  Turtles are consequently protected to avoid extinction.



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Agriculture

submitted by The Archbishop's Seminary : Matthias Borg  for 11-14
dissemination(s): newspaper, school magazine, website
filed under Photos

I took this photo when I went on hike with my family. These are fields near the town of Siġġiewi. Agriculture is very important in our lives. Siġġiewi is a tipical agriculture village. Most of the crops and foodstuffs produced by the farmers are consumed dometicaly. Most local farmers harvest wheat and potatoes they also grow peaches and plums. Nowadays farmers use the drip irrigation system to water their crops. Most of the local farmers do their work manually due to the relatively small size of the fields. Agriculture is very important for us beacuse if we do not have fruits and vegetables we can not stay healthy and these products all come from agriculture.



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The Rainbow

submitted by The Archbishop's Seminary : Kieran Galea  for 11-14
dissemination(s): newspaper, school magazine, tv, website
filed under Photos

This wonderful metereological phenomenon is admired worldwide. Looking at the beautiful spectrum of colours one wonders how this can be created through a few drops of water. When these droplets are looked at from a particular angle in relation to the direction in which the Sun is shining, this spectrum of colours is seen. Nature’s best portraits are indeed original!



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The Gardener’s Friend

submitted by The Archbishop's Seminary : Kieran Galea  for 11-14
dissemination(s): newspaper, school magazine, website
filed under Photos

The Robin (Erithacus rubecula) is a regular visitor to the Maltese Islands. This bird species is one of the few bird species in which both male and female have very similar plumage – with the particular orange breast and face. Its top parts from its head downwards is usually of a greyish brown colour while its belly is white. It mainly feeds on insects and even worms and it hunts during both night and day.For a very long time it was considered to be a gardener’s friend and it was not harmed due to various legends!



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The Maltese Fresh Water Crab

submitted by The Archbishop's Seminary : Craig Cassar, Luca Micallef, Shaun Isherwood  for 11-14
dissemination(s): newspaper, school magazine, website
filed under Photos

The Maltese Fresh Water Crab (Potamon fluviatile ssp. lanfrancoi) is one of many endemic endangered species on the Maltese Islands. In fact it is only found in a few localities in Malta and Gozo. Its habitat usually consists of mud found along fresh water streams and since fresh water is quite scarce, such habitats are continuously decreasing. In the picture, the crab is literally trying to hide by camouflaging itself well with its surroundings, cautiously waiting for its prey to come along! Although it can feed on frogs, this specie also a scavenger.



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