Latest Entries

Wonders of Nature

submitted by Gozo College Middle School : Naomi Pace  for 11-14
campaign: yre-entry
dissemination(s): Eco Schools noticeboard, other, school magazine, school media
filed under Photos reporting-photo
awarded: Commended

The first thing that caterpillars eat is their eggshell. On each side of its head, a caterpillar has 6 tiny eyelets, called stemmata, arranged in a semi-circle. Caterpillars get creative when it comes to self-defence. Life at the bottom of the food chain can be tough, so caterpillars employ all kinds of strategies to avoid becoming a bird snack.

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Could Covid Improve Our Earth?

submitted by Our Lady Immaculate : Cesca Vassallo  for 11-14
campaign: yre-entry
dissemination(s): website
filed under Articles
awarded: Commended

Have you ever stopped to consider how the Covid-19 pandemic has changed the way we live? Have you noticed that some things we are doing now could be saving the earth? Let us consider one simple example. Have your trips to the grocery store become less frequent because you want to lessen your exposure to the virus? There you have it! You’ve already started helping the earth by decreasing your carbon footprint.

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Hide and Seek

submitted by Gozo College Middle School : Naomi Pace  for 11-14
campaign: yre-entry
dissemination(s): Eco Schools noticeboard, other, school magazine, school media
filed under Photos reporting-photo
awarded: Finalist

Chameleons are wonderfully odd reptiles. They change their skin colour for many reasons, such as to blend with their surroundings, to control their body temperature, when they are angry and trying to scare others. Planting more trees ensures a safe home to these endangered species in the Maltese Islands.

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Hope

submitted by Gozo College Middle School : Naomi Pace  for 11-14
campaign: yre-entry
dissemination(s): Eco Schools noticeboard, other, school magazine, school media
filed under Photos reporting-photo
awarded: Finalist

Turtles lay eggs in the same beach that they hatched even though it could be a long way to get to that beach. Turtles are soon becoming extinct because they choke on the plastic of the sea thinking that it’s their food: jellyfish. When an adult female turtle lays eggs, around a hundred of turtle hatchlings hatch and set off on a journey in the sea. If we litter the sea and beaches, these poor little hatchlings won’t be able to go on their journey and continue to reproduce. So, don’t litter anywhere and always follow the three Rs; Reduce, Reuse and Recycle. We can eliminate single-use plastic by buying reusable bottles instead of disposable ones.

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The costly litter issue of family picnics and barbecues.

submitted by Our Lady Immaculate : Mattea Portelli  for 11-14
campaign: yre-entry
dissemination(s): school media
filed under Articles
awarded: Finalist

Maltese families enjoy outdoor outings all year round on beaches and in the countryside. Unfortunately, not all people have the decency to clean up before leaving. This leads to an abundance of post-picnic littering which keeps on adding up until the place resembles a dump yard. This is a big problem for the environment. We all have the responsibility to leave our parks, beaches and countryside exactly how we find them to minimize the impact on the environment and so that others can enjoy them too.

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